told the BBC

Gibraltar International Airport with Gibraltar Rock in the background. Photo: Alamy

When Gemma Cargin boarded the EasyJet plane in Manchester, UK, she decided to have a quick nap. After all, it was only a short 40-minute flight to Belfast where her mother was waiting to pick her up.

After awaking from her slumber, Cargin was surprised to see she was still in the air. But when she asked the flight attendant when the plane was landing in Northern Ireland, a taken-aback crew informed her she was actually on her way to Gibraltar, some 1927km in the opposite direction.

The 25-year-old told the BBC that when she had arrived at Manchester Airport she had gone to what she thought was the correct gate.

“The TV screen that told us the flight wasn’t on at the gate, so I never had a notion I could be getting on to the wrong flight,” said Cargin.

Her boarding pass was scanned and she took her seat for the short hop.

Meanwhile, in Belfast, as time wore on an increasingly worried mother was still waiting for her arrival.

“There was a lot of confusion,” said Cargin. “Mum was told I hadn’t made it on to the Belfast flight and she said her stomach just flipped, because I had texted from the plane to say I was on my way.”

Eventually, mum was notified about the error. Cargin’s stay in Gibraltar was brief. She took a quick selfie from the plane before flying back on the same jet to Manchester, and then onward finally to Belfast.

In all the detour was 3000km and a 40-minute flight ended up taking 12 hours, including a four-hour stopover.

EasyJet said it is investigated the incident with its ground handling partner at Manchester.

“As soon as the mistake was realised, it was arranged for them to fly back to Manchester and on to Belfast, their original intended destination,” said the airline.

“We would like to sincerely apologise for any inconvenience caused.”

Getting onto the wrong plane does happen, although it’s a pretty rare occurrence.

A Ghanaian man took a 3000-kilometre detour after getting a ticket for the wrong plane in South America in 2015.

Emmanuel Akomanyi was attempting to travel to Guyana, but when he got off at the other end he was in the Brazilian city of Goiania.

In 2016, a 16-year-old was supposed to be travelling from Denmark to England with Ryanair. Instead, she landed in Ireland.

A year later, a Tokyo-bound flight returned to Los Angeles hours into the journey after the crew discovered that one of the passengers had boarded the wrong plane.

Stuff.co.nz


LATEST NEWS

NEWS RELATED

London to New York in 3.5 hours: United aims to bring back supersonic travel with Boom

The Boom supersonic jet would reach speeds higher than 2300 km/h. United Airlines aims to bring back supersonic travel before the decade is over with a plane that is currently just an artist’s drawing – even the prototype hasn’t flown yet. The airline said Thursday that it plans to buy 15…

Read more: London to New York in 3.5 hours: United aims to bring back supersonic travel with Boom

Crystalbrook Kingsley, Newcastle: Game-changing new hotel for Australia's second-oldest city

Newcastle-based EJE Architecture and Melbourne’s Suede Interior Design were charged with the iconic brutalist building’s multi-million-dollar reincarnation. The highly anticipated Crystalbrook Kingsley opening on June 9 in Newcastle’s landmark Roundhouse building is a game-changer for Australia’s second oldest city. The city’s first five star hotel offers sustainable luxury in 130 elegant rooms and…

Read more: Crystalbrook Kingsley, Newcastle: Game-changing new hotel for Australia's second-oldest city

Australia international border closure: Why Australia needs to reopen its international borders now

Emotional arrivals at Auckland airport. First “bubble” flight to New Zealand. JQ201 taking off at 6:15am will be the first non quarantined flight from Australia to New Zealand since the borders closed across both countries because of the COVID-19 outbreak Photo Nick Moir 19 April 2021 Photo: Nick Moir It…

Read more: Australia international border closure: Why Australia needs to reopen its international borders now

Travel tips and advice: Airbnb are removing some negative reviews. Here's why

Some users speculate that Airbnb selectively removes negative reviews to protect its top sellers. Photo: Airbnb My family visited Hudson, New York, for a couple of days in March for the same reason everyone goes there. It’s a cool little town surrounded by the Hudson Valley and stocked with wonderful…

Read more: Travel tips and advice: Airbnb are removing some negative reviews. Here's why

How we developed a 'hypersexualised' image of flight attendants

Kaley Cuoco, in HBO’s ‘The Flight Attendant’. There’s something about flight attendants. The job’s mystique has made it a pop culture perennial, most recently in HBO’s buzzy mystery-thriller, The Flight Attendant, whose convoluted plot hinges on the title character’s mobility. Although the job is an increasingly demanding one that has changed…

Read more: How we developed a 'hypersexualised' image of flight attendants

Trans-Tasman bubble could be expanded to include the Pacific

Fiji could be one of the countries included in an expansion of the trans-Tasman bubble. Photo: Supplied New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has turned her focus on the Pacific in the next steps of expanding the trans-Tasman bubble, Stuff.co.nz reports. Ardern met Prime Minister Scott Morrison in Queenstown on…

Read more: Trans-Tasman bubble could be expanded to include the Pacific

No alcohol on plane for Southwest Airlines passengers till end of July

Southwest have ditched plans to restart serving alcohol, following a recent surge in disruptive behaviour from passengers. Photo: AP Southwest Airlines said on Friday it will not resume alcohol services on board until the end of July, ditching its plans to restart next month, following a recent surge in in-flight…

Read more: No alcohol on plane for Southwest Airlines passengers till end of July

Qantas vaccine incentives: CEO Alan Joyce reveals 'mega-prize' for vaccinated passengers

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – DECEMBER 15: The first commercial flight of the Qantas Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft takes off from Tullamarine Airport on December 15, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. The new Boeing 787 Dreamliner took off from Melbourne to Los Angeles beginning a new era for the Australian airline. (Photo by…

Read more: Qantas vaccine incentives: CEO Alan Joyce reveals 'mega-prize' for vaccinated passengers

Qantas Chairman's Lounge: Inside the invite-only club that rejected Jacqui Lambie

Qantas plan to reward vaccinated passengers with points, vouchers

Emirates flight EK501: A Boeing 777 can hold more than 350 passengers, but this flight had just one

Supermoon eclipse, May 26 2021: Qantas passengers get sky-high view of supermoon eclipse

Family walks 2300km along Te Araroa Trail, New Zealand from north to south

Welcome to 'Little Island', New York's newest park with killer views

COVID-19 pandemic delays completion of Spain's Sagrada Familia beyond 2026

Southwest Airlines flight attendant loses two teeth after passenger assault

OTHER NEWS